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Through the Front Door

July 31st, 2014 by Caitlin Zinsser Caitlin Zinsser

In recent news, New York City council members revealed that a new Manhattan high-rise, in which 20% of the units will be reserved for subsidized housing, will have a separate entrance for those units. In the basest terms, low-income residents will be entering through the “back door,” reminiscent of that reserved for servants in earlier centuries.

Google, Hookers, and Heroin

July 18th, 2014 by Lita Kurth Lita Kurth

I’ve been compelled, and I feel kind of sick about it, to read about the Google executive who died when a $1,000-a-time call girl—who found serial killers exciting and sexy— shot him up with too much heroin, on his yacht. The picture of decadence. Nine months earlier, his obit had pictured him as a father of five, married seventeen years whose greatest pleasure was spending time with his family. Of course, people being the complex creatures they are, that might also be true.

Beneath the Veneer of Harris v. Quinn

July 17th, 2014 by Michael C. Duff Michael C. Duff

Harris v. Quinn is a recent Supreme Court opinion, featured often on the news, holding that “partial” public employees – home health care providers – should not be “compelled” to join a union or, put in less charged language, to contribute to union representation in their workplace even when a majority of employees has voted for representation.

“Undercover Boss”: More TV Class Unrealities

July 14th, 2014 by Bev Schwartz Bev Schwartz

Undercover Boss is a prime time reality show on CBS.  The concept is that the CEO of a company is disguised and then goes “undercover” for a week in his/her company doing the low wage work on the front lines to see how things really are.  Typically, bosses are white men, although there have been some women and some people of color.  Most often it’s a CEO, although on occasion it will be somebody else from the executive suite.

Intrusions on solidarity work

July 9th, 2014 by Liz Oppenheimer Liz Oppenheimer

For the past year, I have been having conversations in the predominantly White, middle class, progressive faith community where I worship, about making choices so that our actions would match up with our “all for equality” attitudes.

How I Learned to Check My Privilege

July 8th, 2014 by Teddy Poneman Teddy Poneman

My best friend texted me the other night. He was letting me know that he’d been asked to submit a micro-aggression that happened to him while at Bates College, and was picking between two things I said to him freshman year. The first was, “Wow! You just got so Black!” after watching him debate.

Should Americans Talk About Class?

June 26th, 2014 by Abe Lateiner Abe Lateiner

Helllllllllllllll yes!

“But why?” some ask.

“Sixteen Tons” brings mine wars of ’20s and ’30s alive

June 25th, 2014 by Carol Alexander Carol Alexander

“Are the mules okay?” Not to diminish hard-working mules, but the mine boss’s urgent question after an accident captures the cruel reality thrust upon generations of underground coal miners, whose toil fueled America.

Class Issues in “The Wretched of the Earth”

June 10th, 2014 by Paddy Vipond Paddy Vipond

Frantz Fanon, in his classic account of colonialism and violence, The Wretched of the Earth, went to great length and detail explaining the elements needed to overthrow a colonial oppressor.

Class identity is different for black professionals

June 6th, 2014 by Betsy Leondar-Wright Betsy Leondar-Wright

Why would someone not identify as middle class? Many high-income African American professional homeowners respond to pollsters who ask for class self-identification by not choosing “middle class” or “upper class,” the identities usually chosen by their white counterparts. Why?

My background made them “uncomfortable” at Princeton

May 29th, 2014 by Ana Maldonado Ana Maldonado

On December 1, 2011, I was notified that I had been matched to Princeton University through the QuestBridge program; this meant a full-ride! I was surprised and in a state of euphoria. My teachers were proud; some broke down in tears.

Denial of class in Downton Abbey’s dream world

May 21st, 2014 by Lita Kurth Lita Kurth

Ah, Downton Abbey. Who wouldn’t want to live there? Crises arise, but they are almost always resolved with human kindness. It’s a comforting world; maybe that’s why, despite its blithe ignorance or studied denial of most facts about working-class life, I still watch it. We all need some wish fulfillment, and the wish fulfilled by Downton Abbey is the wish for class harmony.

Modern Family: A Poor Perspective

May 20th, 2014 by Kevin Marinelli Kevin Marinelli

Each year, popular television appears to break new cultural barriers. Perhaps its most vital engine is the critically acclaimed, Modern Family, celebrated for its sophisticated portrayal of non-traditional households. But what if I told you Modern Family is no different from most shows in that it fails to address the poor and working class?

Economist Piketty Offers Bold New Perspective on Inequality

May 16th, 2014 by David Brodwin David Brodwin

In a tour de force of economic analysis that has swept Washington, a 42-year-old French economist has upended conventional wisdom about the causes and consequences of inequality. Tom Piketty’s new book, “Capital in the Twenty-first Century,” quickly hit the New York Times best seller list and earned its author a seat at the table with President Obama’s top economic advisors.

Grassroots Voices Rising for a New Economy

May 15th, 2014 by Aisha Shillingford Aisha Shillingford

Imagine an event where the people in control were the house cleaners, the nannies, the family farmers and the unemployed!

WANTED: Hospitals That Fully Serve Their Communities

April 8th, 2014 by Maynard Seider Maynard Seider

What happens to a poor, working class rural community when its hospital closes  –  with three days notice?  That’s what residents of North Adams, Massachusetts and surrounding towns have been trying to figure out since the North Adams Regional Hospital closed its doors on March 28th.   While local and state politicians scurried to at least keep the emergency room open, members of the two hospital unions, a local labor coalition and other residents temporarily occupied the hospital.

Solutions for servers subsisting on tips

March 25th, 2014 by Maria Myotte Maria Myotte

There are plenty of industries out there that we wish would do better by their workers, but the restaurant industry poses a very specific problem. Here’s the largest and fastest growing economic sector in the US producing 6 of 10 lowest paying jobs in the country. Why? The majority of their workforce don’t get paychecks. The federal tipped minimum wage has been $2.13 since 1991. That wage is quickly devoured by taxes; many servers don’t even bother with picking up their check. Instead, they’re living entirely off tips. Most of us are familiar with living check-to-check, but imagine living quite literally shift-to-shift.

Relying on diners’ good will

March 24th, 2014 by Emma Israel Emma Israel

I recently started waitressing at a neighborhood sports bar, where I quickly found that my idealistic image of leaving work at the end of a shift with hundreds of dollars in hand was far from the truth. A great night for me leads to about $100 in tips, an average night is much closer to the $40-60 range.

Capitalism’s Curtain Call

March 23rd, 2014 by Paddy Vipond Paddy Vipond

There seems to be an elephant in the room when we are discussing the issue of classism. This elephant is so large, and so huge, that the overwhelming majority of us believe that it is actually partaking in the discussion. That it is a member of the debate, and so we pay little attention to it. I feel it is about time that this elephant was confronted.

A surprising class culture pattern

March 12th, 2014 by Betsy Leondar-Wright Betsy Leondar-Wright

When I was studying 25 social justice groups for Missing Class, one of my biggest surprises was a class category I hadn’t even thought to look for: lower professionals. Activists of that class had such unique ways of speaking, participating, and especially dealing with conflict that they had a notable impact on their groups.

Invisible disabilities and class

March 3rd, 2014 by Lena Rothman Lena Rothman

I’d like to open a discussion about class and invisible disabilities. I am a lower-class womyn with a disability called Multiple Chemical Sensitivity. I come from a poverty background in Brooklyn.I incurred this disability because of the work I did to get out of poverty in my 20′s.

Pioneering Black Class-Analysts

February 26th, 2014 by Betsy Leondar-Wright Betsy Leondar-Wright

Black History Month got me thinking about some of the African-American thinkers who have taught me the most about class/race intersections:

Black History and White History are Inseparable

February 26th, 2014 by Brian Miller Brian Miller

The schoolhouse version of Black History Month has rightfully focused on elevating African-Americans who have made great achievements in American history: writers, inventors, and public officials. Giving kids a sense of the possible is an important part of inspiring young people to strive to be the best they can be.

Humiliation at School Should Be a Thing of the Past

February 5th, 2014 by Linda Stout Linda Stout

Dozens of children at a Utah elementary school had their lunch trays snatched away from them before they could take a bite last month.  Salt Lake City School District officials say the trays were taken away at Uintah Elementary School because some students had negative balances in the accounts used to pay for lunches, according to CNN.

Your Public Freeway: First Class or Coach?

January 30th, 2014 by Lita Kurth Lita Kurth

I have to pinch myself lately because it seems the U.S. has been infiltrated by post-Soviet Russian gangsters bent on turning every public good into a private jackpot.

SOTU: Quick reactions to class themes in President’s speech

January 29th, 2014 by Tareq Alani Tareq Alani

Half of Americans are working-class or poor, yet all I heard about in the State of the Union address was the middle class, and now I’m annoyed. I wrote down all of President Obama’s references to class issues.  Here are my quick (possibly overly sarcastic) responses to those references.

Turning down a full ride as a have-not

January 22nd, 2014 by Alysé Bigger Alysé Bigger

A full collegiate scholarship is a dream for some high school students, especially those that come from a low socio-economic status or those that are first-generation college students. While that dream is not a bad dream, it was not my dream.

The Power of Storytelling

January 22nd, 2014 by Jane Van Galen

I’ve long been interested in the complicated processes of crossing class barriers, especially when that crossing is navigated through success in school.  With British sociologist Diane Reay, I believe that we learn a great deal about class when we learn more about the experiences of “the ones who got away”.

When are you no longer a first generation college student?

January 22nd, 2014 by Adj Marshall Adj Marshall

Why was I feeling inadequate, angry, and torn between family and academia, just like first-generation college students feel? I was a graduate student with a college degree, damn it! Shouldn’t these feelings be gone by now?

“Bring Enough for Everyone”: What We Lose When We Lose Public Education

January 21st, 2014 by Lita Kurth Lita Kurth

Did your schoolteachers say, “Don’t bring [candy, toys, coveted items] to school unless you bring enough for everyone”? Mine did. Maybe they recognized how incapable children are of understanding the fundamental injustice of wealth inequality, of some people having immensely desirable things that for some reason cannot be attained by others.

400 Billionaires = Wealth of All 41 Million African-Americans

January 17th, 2014 by Chuck Collins

The racial wealth divide has reached new heights. The billionaires that make up the “Forbes 400” list have as much wealth as the entire African-American population of the U.S., over 41 million people, according to a new analysis by Bob Lord of the Institute for Policy Studies. Lord calls it “Dr. King’s Nightmare.”

Wondering how to respond to a classist guy

January 14th, 2014 by Betsy Leondar-Wright Betsy Leondar-Wright

Is there any point to engaging with someone who’s rigidly dug in to their classism, or other oppressive attitudes?

Toothpaste, Katrina and My Recovery from Classism

January 3rd, 2014 by Amanda Dye Amanda Dye

During my second week living in Boston, I faced one of those frightening moments of choosing whether or not to come out in front of a group that could go against me. I’d been faced with coming out before, but this time it wasn’t coming out as a lesbian, but coming out as poor.

The Unity of Class and the Division of Nationality

January 2nd, 2014 by Paddy Vipond Paddy Vipond

This world is divided into unrepresentative and irrelevant categories. Rather than looking at what we have in common with others, we are told to focus on the differences. It was in Austria, whilst staying with friends of mine in Vienna, that this became apparent.

Pension Cutbacks: The New Normal or Fightback?

December 23rd, 2013 by Maynard Seider Maynard Seider

We should be as wary now of the mainstream media as Marx was in 1871 when he wrote the following:  “The daily press and the telegraph, which in a moment spreads its inventions over the whole earth, fabricate more myths in one day…than could have previously been produced in a century.”

Holiday charity or year-round compassion?

December 23rd, 2013 by Katy Swalwell Katy Swalwell

‘Tis the season to be surrounded with warm fuzzy news stories about people volunteering at food banks or participating in clothing drives or raising money for non-profit groups. When a reporter for a nearby wealthy suburban newspaper called me this morning for my “expert opinion” about how to teach children a “sense of charity,” I bristled. As I responded to her, I felt a bit Grinch-like, spoiling all the fun and dampening the holiday spirit.

Trying to survive on $8.25 an hour

December 13th, 2013 by Ann Berlak and Nelson Myhand Ann Berlak and Nelson Myhand

On Thursday December 5th in 130 cities across the country fast food workers walked off their jobs calling for $15 in wages and the right to form a union.

Isn’t it Time for All Workers to Have More Job Security?

December 10th, 2013 by Rand Wilson Rand Wilson

The United States is alone among industrialized countries in allowing workers to be considered “at will” employees and dismissed for any reason – justified or not, unless protected by a union contract or individual agreement. Labor should seize the opportunity to champion the passage of “just cause” dismissal standards into state laws.

The Worker Center Boogyman

December 9th, 2013 by Michael C. Duff Michael C. Duff

Lately the Chamber of Commerce (the Chamber) has been complaining loudly that Worker Centers are a kind of front group for unions.  Worker centers are community-based and community-led organizations that engage in a combination of service, advocacy, and organizing activities to provide support to low-wage workers. The vast majority of the Centers were created primarily to serve immigrant populations, but they have been expanding to other contexts. One odd thing about the Chamber’s claim is that unions are lawful (indeed union activity has been protected since 1932) and do not therefore require a front group to operate.

‘Black Friday’ has literally consumed Thanksgiving

November 27th, 2013 by Anne Phillips Anne Phillips

You can’t listen to your car radio, open your mailbox, turn on the television or watch a YouTube or Hulu video these days without being bombarded with ‘Black Friday’ mania. What was once a lazy day-after-Thanksgiving to mark the beginning of the holiday shopping season (for those who celebrate gift-giving holidays) has now become a massive event in and of itself.

Now Showing in Seattle: A Multicultural Working Class Movement!

November 26th, 2013 by Lita Kurth Lita Kurth

Any American interested in the working class should know about Kshama Sawant, an open Socialist (and immigrant), who was recently elected to the Seattle City Council.

Class in the Skies

November 25th, 2013 by Shane Lloyd Shane Lloyd

Some time ago, I read a New York Times Opinionator piece, “Class Struggle in the Sky.” Reading about the growing class divisions was particularly disheartening because I spent a fair amount of my childhood traveling in first or business class enjoying the extra leg room, the doting attention of the airline staff, and generous snack and meal offerings. The notion that oppressive dynamics were creeping into a realm that provided me with such fond memories of leisure made me very uncomfortable.

“You Don’t Look Like a Homeowner”

November 20th, 2013 by Celeste Harmer Celeste Harmer

For years my husband and I have nurtured the dream of homeownership, and when it finally came true last year, we were in heaven…but then reality caught up to us, as we ran into people who didn’t think we looked the part.

Classism is in Fashion

November 19th, 2013 by Miki Onwudinjo Miki Onwudinjo

Ever since Miley Cyrus twerked her bum on Robin Thicke’s crotch at the MTV awards, cultural appropriation has been a hot topic. But, society has been capitalizing off of minority cultures long before Miley was even conceived. High-end designers are now adopting hip-hop and urban styles to create a new IT look that has been around since the 80s.

Kanye, the Model Minority Myth, and Class

November 9th, 2013 by Tareq Alani Tareq Alani

Unlike most other days during my sophomore year of high school, I remember this one like it was yesterday: sitting on the bus, putting on my headphones, pressing play on my portable CD Player, and listening to Kanye West’s College Dropout. Since that day ten years ago, College Dropout has remained one of my all time favorite albums.

Gentrification and My New Old Neighborhood

October 29th, 2013 by Melody Chapin Melody Chapin

In 1999 my classrooms in Somerville, Massachusetts– a culturally diverse city bordering Boston– were mosaics of colors and cultures, with students from as far away as Tibet to students whose families had lived in town since the Revolutionary War.  Today in Somerville, hipsters are the name and gentrification is the game.

Debt-Shaming in Contemporary Capitalism

October 28th, 2013 by Gale Newell Gale Newell

I know that Dave Ramsey’s advice has done a lot of good things for a lot of people. There are thousands of people who are currently living debt-free as a result of Ramsey’s approach to personal finance—that’s great, and I’m not trying to take anything away from that. I’m simply saying that, even though Dave Ramsey’s advice works very well for a lot of people, it also has unintended consequences with regard to the way our culture frames poverty.

Neighborhood Class Divisions and Hope for the Future

October 24th, 2013 by Pete Daly Pete Daly

In my neighborhood, kids come around dressed as princesses, super heroes, and ghosts — nothing that would be offensive based on class, race, or religion. Why not? What is different about my neighborhood is that it is a mixture of everyone. Black, white, poor, wealthy, conservative, liberal, and pretty much all the religions common in the United States.

Parading Around in Privilege

October 24th, 2013 by Miki Onwudinjo Miki Onwudinjo

Halloween is quickly approaching and low-quality polyester costumes are flying off shelves like Tickle Me Elmo on Black Friday. In the year of the Hipster, pricey immaculate store-bought costumes are out and pricey immaculate homemade DIY costumes are in. What is now the new Halloween trend is eerily evolving into an upper-crust high cost arts and crafts activity.

9 Classist Halloween Themes to Think Twice About

October 24th, 2013 by Anne Phillips Anne Phillips

In recent years I’ve been glad to see so much coverage exposing the cultural appropriation, racism and sexism inherent in so many Halloween costumes. Students at Ohio University have built a great campaign called “We’re a Culture, Not a Costume,” that highlights real people whose cultures are caricatured around Halloween.  And one of my favorite YouTube videos from last year by the NYC duo, EmotiStyle is titled Things You Can Be On Halloween Besides Naked. This year, I wanted to add a complementary list of classist costumes. A few quick google searches made this task all too easy. (Warning: Heavy sarcasm ahead).


 
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